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enter image description here

In the photo above I can name the first 3 intersection

a) Regular intersection

b) T intersection

c) Skewed intersection

I am having a hard time on identifying the fourth intersection, what do you call that one?

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    $\begingroup$ Can you explain what the "barrier" implies? It looks like there's fewer lanes in the East leg; which lanes coming from the South can turn right, and why does this differ from condition "a" ? $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Jun 22 '16 at 12:46
  • $\begingroup$ The barrier allows all the vehicle on that lane to right turn regardless of the color of the traffic light because they have their own lane; whereas in condition A they need to consider the traffic light, maybe there is a pedestrian so they still need to wait before they can right turn. $\endgroup$ – Cary Bondoc Jun 23 '16 at 5:20
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In UK terminology, your separate turning lane would be called a "filter lane" ( see e.g. Collins dictionary definition). This definition doesn't mean that you can always turn in that lane, it means that this lane is exclusively for turning; traffic in it may or may not have to wait for a green light.

I might therefore be tempted to call it a "crossroads with filter lanes". (I would call your situation a a "crossroads" rather than a "regular intersection". But then I'd also use the word "junction" rather than "intersection"...

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This is probably an example of a channelized intersection, where you have right turn bays that split from the main road just before the intersection:

References:

Individual Movement Treatments - FHWA

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