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Chris Johns
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It is important to remember that, when you design a set of meshing gears you need to keep the size and shape of the teeth the same, irrespective of the diameter. There is a temptation to design a gear template and simply scale the whilewhole thing to get the diameter you want but this does not work.

One implication of this is that for any particular design the range of available diameters available to you is limited by the need to have an integer number of teeth. For example if you start with a gear with diameter D=10 and N = 10 teeth then if you are locked into that ratio so you can't have a diameter of 20.5 as that would imply 20.5 teeth and you can't have half a tooth.

The concept of module is widely used to simplify this design process

It is important to remember that, when you design a set of meshing gears you need to keep the size and shape of the teeth the same, irrespective of the diameter. There is a temptation to design a gear template and simply scale the while thing to get the diameter you want but this does not work.

One implication of this is that for any particular design the range of available diameters available to you is limited by the need to have an integer number of teeth. For example if you start with a gear with diameter D=10 and N = 10 teeth then if you are locked into that ratio so you can't have a diameter of 20.5 as that would imply 20.5 teeth and you can't have half a tooth.

The concept of module is widely used to simplify this design process

It is important to remember that, when you design a set of meshing gears you need to keep the size and shape of the teeth the same, irrespective of the diameter. There is a temptation to design a gear template and simply scale the whole thing to get the diameter you want but this does not work.

One implication of this is that for any particular design the range of available diameters available to you is limited by the need to have an integer number of teeth. For example if you start with a gear with diameter D=10 and N = 10 teeth then if you are locked into that ratio so you can't have a diameter of 20.5 as that would imply 20.5 teeth and you can't have half a tooth.

The concept of module is widely used to simplify this design process

Source Link
Chris Johns
  • 15k
  • 3
  • 20
  • 42

It is important to remember that, when you design a set of meshing gears you need to keep the size and shape of the teeth the same, irrespective of the diameter. There is a temptation to design a gear template and simply scale the while thing to get the diameter you want but this does not work.

One implication of this is that for any particular design the range of available diameters available to you is limited by the need to have an integer number of teeth. For example if you start with a gear with diameter D=10 and N = 10 teeth then if you are locked into that ratio so you can't have a diameter of 20.5 as that would imply 20.5 teeth and you can't have half a tooth.

The concept of module is widely used to simplify this design process